The Believer and Secular Music

Ecclesiastes 7:5 – It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise, than for a man to hear the song of fools.

I have been teaching for the past couple of weeks on the Christian and secular music. It’s been an interesting dialogue with the members of our church.

One of the things I pointed out to the people is that whether you listen to secular music or Christian music, it is very important to listen to the message. Any message that is anti-Christ or biblical principles should be left alone, even if it is under the guise of Christian music. As Solomon said many millennials ago: it’s better to be rebuked than to listen to the song of fools. 

The Bible says that the fool has said in his heart that there is no God. (Psalm 53:1) Looking at this verse, it makes me wonder if Solomon was implying that listening to the songs of a person who has said in their heart that there is no God is not wise. After all, if a fool doesn’t believe in God, then he certainly has no qualms about what he writes and sings about. 

Secular music is defined simply as music that is not written for the church, about God. That would even include nursery songs, the birthday song, patriotic songs, and even holiday songs. 

Secular music is heard all the time, every where you go: in the grocery store, in the beauty salon, in the theaters, on the television, on the bus, in the mall, at the doctor’s office, and when you’re waiting on a call, to name a few. In other words, we all listen to secular music, with or without our consent.

I think the key to Christians listening to secular music first and foremost is, what is this music saying? Are the lyrics clean? If they don’t lift up the name of Jesus, can I at least hear it without blushing or not wanting anyone to know I am listening to it? Is it anti-biblical themes? For example: does it speak of violence, sex outside of marriage, murder, stealing, lying, covetousness…If so, it’s not a good choice of music for the believer!

Even some of the oldies, could be music to stay away from. Do you remember “Me and Mrs. Jones”? It’s about adultery, yet we sang it thinking it was ok, when it was really not ok to sing about a man having an affair with a married woman. Or Ray Charles’ “I’ve Got a Woman” when he not only was singing about an affair, but was using the melody of a gospel song to do it with!

How much are we listening to what we are listening to? I would say, not enough! In John 17:19 Jesus said:  “And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth.”

He sanctified Himself that we might be sanctified, set apart, consecrated to God the Father. He did it for us! Now, we have to do it for ourselves, and our posterity. That they may be sanctified.

Am I saying that you shouldn’t listen to secular music? I am not! But I am saying that you should be mindful of the music you listen to and allow your children to listen to. Some secular music can be fun to listen to, leaving you with a good feeling, while other songs can leave you questioning yourself, your life, your family, your relationship with Jesus, and the world in which you live.  Here’s a song from the past: “Oh be careful little ears what you hear!” Wonderful Jesus!

Published by wonderfuljesus8

I accepted Jesus as my personal Savior and Lord as a child. Once, when I was still quite young, I knocked on a lady’s door, but I don’t remember why. What I do remember is her telling me that I was going to be a preacher. When I was in high school I preached my very first message on Job. It lasted for a long time! LOL! By graduation, I knew that I had been called into ministry. My heart’s desire is to see the people of God understand and operate in the Kingdom of God. We really need to know that we serve an awesome and amazingly good God and our adversary the devil has no good thing dwelling in him.

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